RADIO RANI IS ALL SET TO ADD SOME QUIRK TO THE TRADITIONAL SARI

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We bet you would ditch your regular wardrobe for these saris once you listen to what Radio Rani has to say. Giving saris a whole new dimension, Sneh Nihalani, the founder of this super cool brand has changed the way we think about saris. She tells us why the traditional nine yards is now the coolest thing you can sport.

RADIO-RANI-IS-ALL-SET-TO-ADD-SOME-QUIRK-TO-THE-TRADITIONAL-SARI

BB: Why did you choose to start Radio Rani as a quirky sari brand?

Sneh: I am a sari lover. Married to a South Indian, saris are a staple for us and the urge within me to sport something different made me design and print a few saris for myself. The reviews from friends about my creations were appealing; hence, Radio Rani was born.

BB: How do you think quirky printed saris reinvent an Indian wardrobe?

Sneh: India is a country of stories and inspirations and so many interesting characters. While Indian art and motifs define our wardrobes, it’s time to start looking around for more. It’s time to redefine our culture but with a quirky edge.

BB: What is Radio Rani best known for?

Sneh: Radio Rani is all about draping a sari that unfolds a story or a theme. For example, one of the prints is about Draupadi’s gatha from the Mahabharata called Maha Rani, while another one is based on matchbox covers from all over the world and is called Risky Rani. The new collection for festive and wedding season this year is called Gambler Rani, and is inspired by playing cards.

BB: What are the must-have quirky prints for an Indian wardrobe from your collection?

Sneh: It depends on the kind of person you are! While a traveller would like a Road Rani, a storyteller would prefer a Raja Rani and someone who likes to take chances would lean towards Gambler Rani.

BB: Which is your favourite piece from your collection? Why?

Sneh: I like Peace Rani, a sari that depicts how one can find peace in life and in colour.


Related Tags:regular wardrobe, Sneh Nihalani, Married to a South Indian, country of stories